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Family Relationships

Self-help books on Family Relationships

Introduction

There are so many popular psychology texts in the shops that it can be difficult to know where to begin. This set of book-lists was compiled by staff of the University Counselling Service to respond to those students who have asked us what they might read on this topic.

Our selection is not intended to be the 'final word' - we are sure that there are many other good and helpful books out there; in any case we recognise that what is helpful is very subjective and depends on personal circumstances.

Books are listed in alphabetical order by author. Copies of some of these books are available to borrow on a weekly basis from the University Counselling Service.

Disclaimer

The descriptions given are intended to provide a summary of the contents but should not be taken to imply that the Counselling Service endorses the opinions expressed.


Family Relationships

Date of information: Jan 2006, updated Feb 2010


 

Overcoming Your Child's Fears and Worries
Cathy Creswell and Lucy Willetts, Robinson, 2007

A CBT self-help book describing step-by-step practical strategies that you can use to help your children overcome their fears, phobias and worries.


Overcoming Your Child's Shyness and Social Anxiety
Cathy Creswell and Lucy Willetts, Robinson, 2007

A CBT self-help book describing step-by-step practical strategies that you can use to help your children overcome their shyness and social anxiety worries.


How to Cope with Difficult Parents
Windy Dryden & Jack Gordon, Sheldon Press, 1995

A guide intended for adults who suffer from problems in their relationships with their parents, yet feel that family links should continue. This book advises how problems might be faced and resolved in a mature way so that cycles of confrontation can be broken. The book deals with emotional blackmail, rejection, manipulation, constant demands, jealousy, and abusive or critical behaviour.


Toxic Parents
Susan Forward, Bantam, 2002

Dr. Forward writes about the painful legacy left by parents seen as inadequate, and suggests self-help techniques for children who may wish to leave the past behind.


Growing Up Again
Jean Illsley Clarke & Connie Dawson, Second Revised Edition 1998

This guide speaks in a supportive and non-judgemental tone to parents and other adults who work with children. The authors show why providing children with structure and nurturing is so critical to the development of self-esteem. They also explore the ages and stages of development, ways to nurture ourselves and our children, and tools for personal and family growth.


Families and How to Survive Them
Robin Skynner, John Cleese, Arrow, 1994

Written as a conversation between two people, this book provides a description of how and why we fall in love, how we develop from babies to adolescents to adults, and how during this development we may become stuck in child-like behaviour. Utilising modern experiences of family therapy, the book seeks to show how compatible relationships in families can be made and maintained.